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20121222
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Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
, the left in the united states has plenty of problems with science when it comes to issues they don't support. it's about an hour and a half. >> my name is kenneth agreement and a resident scholar here at the enterprise institute and i work on primarily energy and environmental policy issues. i'm a scientist as well as alex and my doctoral degree is environmental science and engineering. so i am really excited to have this event today on science called "science left behind," alex's great book, and before we start, if i seem a little fuzzy you've seen the commercial that goes something like this when you pay too much for cable you through things and if you throw things people think you have anger issues some people think you have anger issues in your schedule up and you grow a scraggly beard and you start taking in stray animals and you can't stop taking in stray animals don't pay much for cable. i have my own version today to the appeal to the kafeel you have a checkup and when he gives you a check that you have a flu shot at a tetanus booster. when you have the booster do we get th
cuts should be extended and for whom. taxation is not an economic science. it definitely -- if you gather 10 people in a room, you're going to get 10 different opinions and the views on taxing -- on the merits and philosophy of taxing individual asks the rich will vary. but, you know, this sort of immediate problem is not necessarily the larger philosophical question. it really is the more practical question of what is our tax system going to look like. host: and we've got this lead editorial from this morning's "wall street journal." real housewife offense the beltway. they write -- host: back to the phones. don in oklahoma city on our line for democrats. go ahead, don. caller: good morning. i have a couple of quick comments i would like to make. the first is that i find it ironic for so many years in recent history republicans have claimed to own patriotism yet they don't seem to want to vacate their fair share. host: joseph rosenberg. guest: you know, i mean, i'm not sure, you know, i'm not sure this is about pay. -- patriotism or anything like that. you know, the question of wh
this evening's collaboration of our national news and science programs. yesterday, she sat down with education secretary arne duncan for the special. it was the former chicago public school superintendent's first interview since the killings. here's part of their conversation. >> secretary duncan where does the responsibility lie for action here? >> it lies on all of us. all of us as parents, as community leaders, as religious leaders, as political leaders. no one gets to pass on this. and this is to the a time to point fingers or lay blame. often these things, there are lots of inclinations to do that but this is complex and anyone who wants to say there is a simple answer here i think does a great disservice to the complexity and urgency of fundamentally trying to make our country a safer place for our children. >> ifill: the president has asked the committee that you will be on, that vice president biden is going to spearhead to come up with solution or approaches within a month, before the state of the union speech. do you worry that the outrage is going to fade before that happens? >> i d
. you say that this is unsound science and potentially could lead to problems. why do you believe that there is not a value in at least looking at this gunman's dna? >> well, first of all, let me say that my heart goes out to all the people in newtown, connecticut. this was an horrific series of events. second of all, the major problem that i have as a geneticist is that it's impossible to gain much information with the sample size of one. so what you are looking at is one person's dna, and you're trying to say that it's different than other people. but you only have a sample size of one. >> would it be helpful, do you think, to look at the dna of other shooters of those from previous mass shootings? >> well, again, the problem is, we have probably less than five or even ten people that we're talking about. when studies -- accurate genetic studies are done on a whole population, we look for hundreds of different people, and you have to show a strong correlation with that. and the second problem would be what are we trying to look for? i mean, we're going -- the whole idea is you'r
. >> there's science to it. >> there's heavy science and we tell you all about it in the book. >> we know what happens when we eat junk food. we get father, but what happens inside the body? >> a lot of things happen. we eat too much we gain fat and it's toxic. it surrounds our vital organs causes a toxic disease. it's killing us. >> there's two things here what you eat and what you do with your body. what's going on, chris, with our body and what does it take to cement that habit? >> one of the nice things about the book nice guys don't talk about exercise a lot. we talk about it all the time. it's the flywheel of maintenance. it does all kinds of stuff to help you lose weight be healthier, more optimistic or more energetic. we told people it makes a world of sense to work out semi hard six days a week. people go, what? way too scarey. but you have to do it. >> weight's become a bad buzzsquoorks . >> wheat's become a bad buzz world. >> 1% of the americans have celiac disease and they can't have wheat in their diet. i think it's easy for us to say, hey, we can't eat whe
straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. ashley: so what is the bright spot for next year? oppenheimer says it's domino's pizza, anywhere you slice it. the stock moving higher today. right now up just about 1 1/3%, up 56 cents at 43.37. oppenheimer says look the pizza maker in a good position for 2013, thanks to its same-store sales, innovation and international business, oppenheimer also raising its price target on domino's 6 bucks from 44 to 50. it's right now at 43.39. domi domino's up almost 30% for the year. it's been an amazing day. down 148 points at one point. dave asman, shibani joshi turn up and we're up 10 points. take it away. david: it is not the number. it's the turn around. about 150 point turn around. shibani: just to show you how volatile the markets are and how sensitive they are to comments coming out of washington and any advancement on the fiscal debt talks, the talk that congress is coming back to work on sunday, that turned everything around. david: let's go to
to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> okay. two and a half minutes left. we've talked a lot about the resilience of the markets even in the face of the fiscal cliff market. maybe the market has been taking this in stride. look what happened today. we almost got to 20, the yellow flag area. we haven't been to 20 on the vix since back in july, early july, and today we're up 3.7% at 1928. however, look at a one--year chart of the dow comparing it to the vix. what often happens is when the vix peaks as it did in june and july, that can mark a bottom in the stock market so we're starting to move up again. i'm just saying. not trying to forecast anything and here's what happened today at the dow, sort of falling off here in the latter part of the hour but not off. off the lows of the day. down 21 points. material stocks were the strength today. up 1.5%. everybody else was either unchanged or lower. what do you make of the increased volatility or increased fear here, david darst, as we go into the end of the year
this collaboration of all our national news and science programs. check your local listings. i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. we'll see you online and, as it's looking like the end is not upon us yet, again here monday evening. have a nice winter weekend. thanks for joining us. good night. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to le a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org
. this summer, he showed us the science behind every shape, size, and shade of these pixels. >> you now have your camouflage. so we're trying to trick the brainseeing things that aren't actually there. >> reporter: digital shapes creates depth and shadows where none exist. that's today's design. >> what's coming up down the road and very quickly is the harry potter cloak. >> what is that? >> reporter: with that fictional cloak, harry isn't just camouflaged, he's invisible. >> my body's gone! >> how invisible are we talking here? if i walked into a room with a soldier wearing one of these cloaks -- >> you wouldn't see him at all. he would be completely invisible to you. >> reporter: this isn't make-believe. the military has seen this so-called quantum stealth technology. it works by bending the light around an object, even concealing most of a person's shadow. imagine what that could do for a sniper, hiding in a field, or the american pilots who ejected over libya when their fighter jets crashed last year. >> they could actually pull out, very similar to what they carry with a survival blanke
to understand there is no established science right now to determine whether or not a gene will predispose someone to violent behavior. i mean that's the first thing. this is a very complicated situation. people have genes. they don't always predispose or actually turn into a specific problem. and in this case if someone were to be found to have a gene, and this is a needle in a haystack, it might give some clues as to whether or not someone might or, other people might be predisposed to this kind of crime. heather: this would be a first of a kind study or a first of a kind research to >> again, there have been studies that have been done on violent offenders, and previously and we have gotten some body of evidence that helped us to determine whether this is a problem. where it is more established, where we're doing genetic testing where it is incredibly value in determining predisposing conditions such as taysak's disease or whether someone ends up with sickle cell anemia. whether someone is predisposed to alzheimer's or cancer it gets controversial and this particular probably the most c
, and he'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. gee you are watching cnbc's "squawk on the street," live from the financial capital on the world. the opening bell set to ring on that balcony in a couple minutes there the big board, west virginia university and syracuse university, the football teams playing in the new era pinstripe bowl at yankee stadium this saturday. i know melissa is going p. >> for sure. we are carpooling, right, carl? >> at the nasdaq, iraq and afghanistan, veterans of america, a non-profit organization with more than 200,000 members. great to see them today as well. a lot of charity this morning, even on the general news morning shows about facebook. if you haven't heard already, randi zuckerberg posted a pitch of her family, thought it was private, somebody saw it on their feed, put it on twitter, she responded angrily saying it was way uncool and beyond human decency and it has raised, once again this argument, debate about privacy settings and whether or not you should tru
on polling science them raw emotion from a campaign during battle. there was a sense among republicans that chris christie had stabbed him in the back. what's interesting about these candidates to do the crossover move is they tend to alienate the base and they tend to lose their effectiveness of a party that they cross over to. in recent days, talking to people in the senate you actually feel that his support for the $60 billion request for 70 relief is hurting them with republicans. things move on rather quickly in politics. host: there are lingering peelings that he did not do what romney expected with the keynote address. he said he said that today and a half before and they did not change anything. guest: there's a lot of grumbling when it comes to chris christie. a lot of them felt he cared more about himself than governor romney. he was not a staff favorite, to put it mildly. when the grumbling that took place after the hurricane, he said he understood because he has been a governor and he needs to concentrate on his staff. a lot of them more deeply angry about his embrace. pres
each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> we are at the top of the hour. hello to you all. welcome to "weekends with alex witt." i'm t.j. holmes in for her today. 1:00 in the east, 10:00 in the west. let me tell you what is happening. we've got three days to go until we go off that cliff, the fiscal cliff. new today one key congressman is giving us a sober status report of where things are. >> i think there is a sense of urgency, t.j., just because of where we are. we're right at the deadline. as a matter of fact, it looks like we will be here on new year's eve and possibly new year's day. they've already alerted us, members of the house, to look at the possible way of doing that. >> at this hour, senate leaders are scrambling to piece together a last-minute deal to avoid middle class tax hikes and possibly delay steep spending cuts. both sides weighing inned to. >> congress can prevent it from happening if they act now. leaders in congress are working on a way to prevent this tax hike on the middle class, i believe we may be ab
on a road trip through los angeles to get to the california science center where it's now on display. and now the shuttle "atlantis" is taking its place in history without traveling anywhere. cnn's john zarrella is at the kennedy space center. hey, john. >> reporter: hey, candy. you're right, "atlantis" is really the only one of the shuttles that didn't have to take wing to get to its future museum landing site. "atlantis" in november literally just went ten miles down the road from the vehicle assembly building here to the visitor complex. for the viewers out there saying, where is it? that's it right there behind me. that is "atlantis." and it is completely wrapped in shrink wrap. why is that? because they are building the facility, the museum around the shuttle. so it's quiet here now. but i have to tell you, all day today, the workmen were just hammering and they're putting up scaffolding and they're finishing this up by july when the grand opening will be. in march, they're going to actually unwrap "atlantis" when most of the work will be done then. but you can see it's on a 45-
.s. department of agriculture, social science analyst. thank you for being with us. >> thank you for having us. >> tomorrow, we will continue looking at fiscal cliff negotiations and how americans will be affected if the deadline passes. our guest will be joseph rosenberg, followed by a look by presidential campaigning and the influence of the electoral college. then a discussion on hurricane sandy relief funding. we will be joined by dan freed iedman. all that beginning at 7:00 a.m. eastern here on c-span. ♪ >> if we turn away from the needs of others, we align ourselves with those forces which are bringing about this suffering. >> the white house is a bully pulpit and you ought to take advantage of it. >> obesity is nothing short of a public health conference. >> i think i had little antennas go up that told me when somebody had there an agenda. >> it would be a shame to waste it. >> i think they serve as a window on the past to what was going on with american women. >> she becomes the chief confidante, really any way the only one in the world he could trust. >> they were writers, journali
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)